3U GLOBAL HEALTH

While there have been extraordinary developments in medicine and public health over the last two centuries, in the poorer regions of the world we have failed to deliver on the promise of medical science. As just one example, each year around one million children under the age of five die as a result of infections from drinking dirty water.

 

Technologies exist or are being developed to address such global health problems, but implementing them needs a careful understanding of how the solutions can be used in practice. There is a long and difficult journey from a solution that works in a laboratory or pilot scheme to a scalable affordable solution that works for and is accepted by diverse communities around the world.

 

3U GLOBAL HEALTH brings together a broad spectrum of inputs and understanding, and teamwork across different academic and professional disciplines, combining scientific, engineering, medical, sociological and anthropological expertise to develop appropriate technologies for the developing world and to support countries and communities to establish sustainable solutions for their health and development.

 

Specific projects that will be enriched through the initiative include solar disinfection of drinking water, which uses energy from sunlight to kill pathogens in water stored in plastic or glass bottles, and the development of mobile phone-based diagnostic and analysis technologies for the poorest communities in the developing world.

 

3U Global Health has six major research themes

 

Sharing skills and capacity building in distance and blended education – either conducting open training sessions or establishing a social  network which would support one another…

 

COSYST-MNCH is a partnership of RCSI (lead), DCU, College of Medicine(CoM), University of Malawi and Concern Worldwide Ireland and Malawi. It is funded through Irish Aid/HEA…

 

Sixteen years after the advent of protease inhibitors and effective combination therapy for HIV infection, the nature of the AIDS epidemic is changing…

 

Health outcomes are tightly linked to social, economic, and political inequalities, both between and within countries…

 

The importance of technology in health has been recognised by the World Health Organisation who launched a call for innovative technologies in 2009…..

 

The 2014 WHO Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) Report estimates that nearly 780 million people remain without reliable access to safe drinking water across the globe…