Qualification: Master of Engineering in Digital Health and Medical Technologies

Award Type: TAUGHT MASTERS

NFQ Level: 9

PAC Code: 3U02F

This exciting new programme will produce engineers capable of designing and developing electronic devices and systems for the medical and healthcare communities. These individuals will become flexible technologists who can work within the health services, hospitals and indigenous and international companies, providing products and services to frontline medical and healthcare providers.

Through this programme, graduates with a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Electronic Engineering (or cognate disciplines) will extend their engineering skills and technical knowledge to work in partnership with healthcare clinicians and other medical experts − thereby acquiring a grounding in the culture, philosophy and language of the healthcare profession. The graduates would be expected to develop strong skills in negotiating the clinical/technology interface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Programme Commencing
September 2017

 

Duration
This masters programme may be completed within 1 year on a full-time basis (pending approval by RCSI).
This is a new programme, with a novel cross-institutional Capstone Project, though many of the taught modules are existing modules in one of the 3U partner institutions. It is designed for engineering professionals with a strong background in electronics and computer technologies, and will provide them with advanced education in medically relevant engineering technologies. They will be immersed in the cultural and professional ethos of medical and clinical practice. The programme will provide them with the relevant concepts, methodological tools and knowledge of medical legal, ethical and regulatory frameworks.

 

The first 2 semesters (15 week per semester) of this masters programme comprise a range of taught modules with examinations. This is immediately followed by the Caspstone Project (12 weeks),  which includes workshops and seminars. Assessment of the Capstone Project will be primarily via a dissertation which includes a short conference-style paper. There is currently no part-time option to complete this programme.
The modules on the programme are designed to provide expertise in two technical areas: firstly, the technology for designing new medical devices; and secondly, image and signal analysis to assist diagnosis and visualisation. These modules are complemented with in-depth modules on the medical sciences, ethics and regulations.

 

Medical Modules

  • Medical Sciences (RCSI)
  • Healthcare Ethics, Law, Risk Management and Regulatory Framework (RCSI)

 

Medical Technology Modules

  • 3D Interface Technologies (DCU)
  • Medical Instrumentation (Maynooth University)

 

Underlying Engineering Modules

  • Connected Embedded Systems (DCU)
  • Computer Vision (DCU)
  • Wireless Communications (Maynooth University)
  • Advanced Control Systems (Maynooth University)

 

Capstone Project (RCSI + MU/DCU)
The Capstone project is a major feature of the programme which provides the student with practical experience of developing engineering solutions for the medical sector. Projects are hosted by the Electrical Engineering Departments of either DCU or Maynooth University but are always strongly situated in a medical or clinical environment. During their project, students are co-supervised by RCSI staff or an RCSI-linked consultant/clinician on the one hand, and an engineering/computing academic from Maynooth University or DCU on the other. The projects are developed, assigned and prepared during the first (taught module) academic year so that they are ready to run during the first semester of the second academic year. For more information on the programme and for examples of the Capstone Project CHECK OUT our video on YouTube.

 

 

Entry Requirements
Entry to the Master of Engineering in Digital Health and Medical Technologies will normally require a minimum H2.1 in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, or a cognate discipline. Or Minimum 60% from Bachelor programme in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, or a cognate discipline. Exceptions may be made for those with significant relevant work experience.

 

**Exceptions may be made for those with significant relevant work experience.**

Fee Information

  • EU fees are €7,000
  • Non-EU fees are €14,000

2 Scholarships will be available for this programme on a competitive basis

  • One scholarship available to EU students: Up to 20% off EU fee
  • One scholarship available to Non EU students: Up to 20% off Non EU fee.

Programme Co-ordinator
Dr Tomás Ward
E: tomas.ward@nuim.ie
T: +353 1 708 4684

 

For further information, please contact
Caitríona Campbell

E: caitriona.campbell@dcu.ie
T: +353 1 700 6857

This exciting new programme will produce engineers capable of designing and developing electronic devices and systems for the medical and healthcare communities. These individuals will become flexible technologists who can work within the health services, hospitals and indigenous and international companies, providing products and services to frontline medical and healthcare providers.

Entry to the Master of Engineering in Digital Health and Medical Technologies will normally require a minimum H2.1 in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, or a cognate discipline.  Exceptions may be made for those with significant relevant work experience. The course requires that you have an IELTS of : 6.5 minimum overall score.

September of any given year.

Applicants for all 3U graduate programmes must apply online through the Postgraduate Applications Centre in Galway (PAC) www.pac.ie/3U

  • EU fees are €7000
  • Non-EU fees are €14,000

This masters programme may be completed within 1 year on a full time basis (pending final approval by RCSI).

The first 2 semesters (15 week per semester) of this masters programme comprise a range of taught modules with examinations. This is immediately followed by the Capstone Project (12 weeks), which includes workshops and seminars. Assessment of the Capstone Project will be primarily via a dissertation which includes a short conference-style paper.

The convergence between Healthcare/Medical Technologies, ICT, and electronic devices and systems will accelerate over the coming decades, leading to products and technologies to support medical diagnoses, in-hospital care, rehabilitation and in-the-community supports. This represents new opportunities for Irish health professionals, engineers and technologists. A recent Irish Business and Employers Confederation (IBEC) conference focused on the integral role which healthcare and ICT play in what they estimate to be an approximately US$6 trillion global market.

 

The graduates of this Master of Engineering in Digital Health and Medical Technologies programme will be building and creating new tools and solutions to solve relevant problems facing the healthcare sector today. This programme will empower graduates to be the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs in the growing healthcare technologies sector. Graduates can expect to work both inside and outside the health services. Within healthcare services, the focus would be primarily on software and engineering of healthcare-directed services and systems. Beyond the core health services environment, graduates could work with companies that provide technology-based products for use in a medical or clinical environment.

Medical Modules

  • Medical Sciences (RCSI)
  • Healthcare Ethics, Law, Risk Management and Regulatory Framework (RCSI)

 

Medical Technology Modules

  • 3D Interface Technologies (DCU)
  • Medical Instrumentation (Maynooth University)

 

Underlying Engineering Modules

  • Connected Embedded Systems (DCU)
  • Computer Vision (DCU)
  • Wireless Communications (Maynooth University)
  • Advanced Control Systems (Maynooth University)

This masters programme may be completed within 1 year on a full time basis. This is a full-time programme comprises a range of modules with accompanying examinations. The students will complete a Capstone Project, which includes workshops and seminars, in the first semester. Assessment of the Capstone Project will be primarily via a dissertation which includes a short conference-style paper.
There is currently no part-time option to complete this programme.
The modules on the programme are designed to provide expertise in two technical areas: firstly, the technology for designing new medical devices; and secondly, image and signal analysis to assist diagnosis and visualisation. These modules are complemented with in-depth modules on the medical sciences, ethics and regulations.

Academic Programme lecturers are available to give advice and support through the programme.

On successful completion of the programme, non-EU graduates of the 3U MEng in Healthcare Technologies programme are entitled to work full time in Ireland for 12 months.  At the end of this period, graduates that secure a permanent post with an annual salary of  €30,000 are eligible to apply for a work permit which allows them to stay in Ireland indefinitely to continue this employment.

Programme Co-ordinator
Dr Tomás Ward
T: +353 1 708 4684
E: tomas.ward@nuim.ie

 

 

For further information, please contact
Caitríona Campbell
T: +353 1 700 6857
E: caitriona.campbell@dcu.ie

Applications are assessed on an ongoing basis by the Programme Chairperson. It is recommended that interested applicants apply sooner rather than later so a decision can be made in good time before the start of term. After reading this FAQ, potential applicants are welcome to address any further queries they have to the two contact points above.

This programme is not an online course. Whilst an array of methodologies, tools and technologies will be used in delivering the taught elements, there are elements of all modules on the programme that require some level of on-campus attendance for all participants.

No. This is masters programme may be completed within 1 year on a full time basis

For now, the programme is offered on a full-time basis only.

The medical and healthcare sector has a culture, ethos, structure and language that are very distinct to the traditional application domain of the skills of the graduate electronic engineer. This can make for a steep and expensive learning curve for the engineer trying to design and innovate in this sector, whether as an SME entrepreneur or in an established corporate environment. This programme provides the graduate with a bridge between these two domains for an application area that is demonstrating enormous growth potential.

 

The high-level aim of this programme is to produce engineers capable of designing and developing electronic/information systems for the medical and healthcare communities. It does this by taking engineering professionals with a strong background in electronics and computer technologies, and:

  • providing them with advanced education in medically-relevant engineering technologies;
  • providing them with the relevant concepts, methodological tools and knowledge of medical legal, ethical and regulatory frameworks
  • immersing them in the cultural and professional ethos of medical and clinical practice

It is not planned that participants on this programme would have direct and un-supervised access to patients or clients of the medical and healthcare organisations hosting the project work associated with this programme. Hence, Garda vetting is not currently either required or provided for entry to this programme.

In general, an interview is not a standard requirement in the assessment process for entry to this programme. However, the institutions operating this programme reserve the right to request an applicant to participate in an interview if that is indicated by the information provided in the PAC application. Such an interview would normally be reserved for cases where the applicant does not quite meet the programme entry requirements, or their academic background is non-standard in terms of what is envisaged as the default for entry to the programme.

The taught modules on the programme will be delivered in one of the three partner institutions at any given time. In general, Year 1, Semester 1 is in Maynooth University, Year 1 Semester 2 is in DCU, while Year 2, Semester 1 will be delivered in a combination of one or two of the three partner institutions, plus the organisation associated with the lead medical supervisor of the project. In addition, there are taught elements delivered in RCSI just before or just after the standard Maynooth University and DCU semesters (which, incidentally, are themselves not identical).

 

In general, a student will be based in just one of the institutions on any given day, and indeed for the most part, on any given week, and will thus not have to travel between institutions to accommodate academic activities on the same day.

The structure and objectives of the capstone project are unique in an engineering context. The co-ordination of the module will be the joint responsibility of Maynooth University and RCSI, but there will be supervisors from all three institutions. Projects will be in clinical settings or contexts, co-supervised by RCSI staff or an RCSI-linked consultant/practitioner on the one hand, and an engineering/computing academic from Maynooth University or DCU on the other. The specification and ethical clearance of some of the projects will be a much larger task than would normally be the case for engineering Master’s projects, so it is envisaged that projects will be developed, assigned and prepared during the first (taught module) academic year in order to be ready to run during the first semester of the second academic year.

 

During Semester 1 of Year 1, project titles will be made available to the student cohort for selection, again using an online project allocation tool. Students will be asked to rank all projects in order of preference, and projects will be allocated on this basis. Where there are multiple preferences for a project, a random allocation system will be used. During Semester 2 of Year 1, the students start their preliminary literature search, produce a literature review, and write the proposed methodology. An oral presentation will be given in an agreed location (which may be one of the partner campuses, or a suitable clinical location) and relevant academic and clinical staff and supervisors will be present. Also during this period, all preparatory elements (such as ethics approval) will be completed.

 

To reflect the importance of ethics approval for a project engaging clinical activity, all candidates will be required to prepare an ethics approval application, and where required, to seek approval from the relevant ethics committee(s). This will normally be the RCSI Ethics Committee, but in some cases, projects may also require approval from ethics committees in Maynooth University, DCU, and/or the clinical environment in which the project will operate.

 

During Semester 1 of Year 2, the student will embark on the direct implementation of the project under the supervision of their assigned supervisors. Under normal circumstances it is expected that all work on the project would be completed during this semester. Students will be required to prepare and deliver an oral presentation of their final project which will form part of the final project mark. Each project will be marked by a Clinician/RCSI academic and an engineer, including one non-supervisor assessor.

2 Scholarships will be available for this programme on a competitive basis:

  • One scholarship available to EU students: Up to 20% off EU fee
  • One scholarship available to Non EU students: Up to 20% off Non EU fee.

This exciting programme produces specialist engineering masters graduates capable of designing and developing electronic devices and systems for the medical and healthcare communities. These individuals will become flexible engineers who can work in many different environments. These include frontline healthcare settings such as hospitals as well as the wide range of indigenous and multinational medical technology companies based here in Ireland and abroad.

 

The Irish Medtech Sector – Key Facts
There is an excellent dedicated website for the Irish Medtech sector at www.imda.ie; If you would like to see an overview of the sector in Ireland, the companies and their location please visit Irish Medtech sector

  • The medical technology sector in Ireland is vitally important to Ireland’s economy and it is recognised as one of the five global emerging hubs. The sector employs over 25,000 people in Ireland which represents 6% of Europe’s medtech workforce.
  • In Europe, the industry generates over €100 billion annually and employs approximately 575,000 people. 95% of these companies are small to medium enterprises.
  • Ireland is one of the largest exporters of medical products in Europe with annual exports of €8 billion and companies here directly export to over 100 countries worldwide.
  • 18 of the world’s top 25 medical technology companies have a base in Ireland and 50% of the 300 medtech companies based here are indigenous.
  • Ireland also boasts an incredible strong services and contract research & manufacturing base; in fact 50% of the companies located here are in the business to business space.

Pressures on healthcare systems have resulted in a greater focus on enhanced efficacy of treatments and cost reduction. There is no sense of complacency across the sector in Ireland where industry and Government alike are constantly looking for new ways to enhance competitiveness, develop new capabilities and ultimately generate new sustainable growth.

 

Work Permits
On successful completion of the programme, non-EU graduates of the 3U Master of Engineering in Digital Health and Medical Technologies programme are entitled to work full time in Ireland for 12 months. At the end of this period, graduates that secure a permanent post with an annual salary of €30,000 are eligible to apply for a work permit which allows them to stay in Ireland indefinitely to continue this employment.

 

Job creation
Over 2,000 jobs have been announced since 2012 along with €300 million investment in the industry. A lot of the recent investment is by existing companies investing in R&D and innovation. While innovation is core the industry in Ireland, the Irish Government is also committed to enhancing Ireland’s manufacturing competitiveness and as such have established a cross sectorial Manufacturing Forum with representatives from many stakeholders to work collaboratively to develop our infrastructure, competencies and skillsets here. The Irish medtech sector has continued to grow strongly in 2014, 2015 and 2016 with major investments and developments were announced by IMDA members and by the industry in general. Some of the headline announcements are listed below:

  • In September 2016 Irish medtech firm Oneview Healthcare has announced it is to create 100 jobs across its international offices, with half to be based in the company’s headquarters in Dublin.
  • Health and fitness band maker Fitbit is to establish its EMEA headquarters in Dublin, with plans to employ 50 people this year and up to 100 employees by the end of 2017. IDA Ireland chief executive Martin Shanahan said Fitbit’s decision to come to Dublin was a strong endorsement of Ireland’s reputation as a place for fast-growing tech companies to build and support their future international growth
  • In 2015, world leading health care manufacturing company Zimmer, confirmed it is investing €51million and to creating 250 manufacturing jobs over the next five years in Galway.
  • AbbVie Inc officially opened its recently expanded facility in Sligo with the creation of 175 highly skilled jobs. This site will be involved in commercialising and manufacturing pipeline products for liver disease, oncology and women’s health.
  • Becton, Dickinson and Company has revealed plans for a €16m investment in new equipment for its Drogheda site. This will result in 20 new jobs being brought to the region and will increase the production portfolio for the plant.
  • Clearstream Technologies has finalised the 50,000 square foot expansion of its Enniscorthy facility. This will enable the company to accommodate an additional 200 jobs on top of its current workforce of 410, and allow the plant to add new products to its portfolio.
  • Ethicon Biosurgery Ireland, part of the Johnson & Johnson Family, has planned an €80m, 60,000 square foot manufacturing facility. This will lead to the creation of over 270 permanent and 150 temporary jobs in the Limerick area.
  • Hollister Incorporated has committed an €80m investment to their facility in Ballina, Co. Mayo. This has previously added extra manufacturing R&D processes to the site. To date, Hollister employs over 500 people.
  • Nelipak Healthcare Packaging, which established itself in Ireland in 1995 after the acquisition of Plasmedics, has announced an increase of 10 in its permanent workforce, bringing its headcount up to 86 people.
  • Stryker Corporation will be investing in a 44,000 square foot cutting-edge surgical Innovation Centre that will focus on the R&D for product design and process development. This complex will have simulated operating rooms and surgical environments, allowing surgeons and engineers to evaluate new ideas and technologies. The facility is expected to be
    completed in Q4 2015.
  • Teleflex Incorporated plans to significantly boost its EMEA operations in Athlone with the announcement that over 100 high-skilled positions will be generated in the next three years.
  • VistaMed opened a new 35,000 square foot expansion in its Carrick-on-Shannon manufacturing facility. Up to 125 jobs are expected to be generated as a result of this investment.
  • West Pharmaceuticals Services revealed plans to invest €100m in a new facility in Waterford that will produce packaging components for insulin injector cartridges and other high quality products. This will eventually lead to the creation of 250 – 300 jobs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

career options
Enquiries